Hurricane forecasters on Friday, Sept. 16, 2022, were tracking three systems in the Atlantic, including Tropical Storm Fiona. (Image via National Hurricane Center)

Yesterday’s one that might have come still is uncertain. The other two we don’t have to worry about.

Hurricane forecasters on Friday morning were tracking three systems in the Atlantic, including¬†Tropical Storm Fiona. They do not pose an immediate threat to Louisiana. Fiona formed late Wednesday, becoming the sixth named storm of the 2022 hurricane season. It’s heading into the Caribbean and then is expected to turn north toward the Bahamas, according to the National Hurricane Center.¬† The Gulf of Mexico is expected to be quiet for the next 48 hours. Here’s what we know about the tropics as of 7 a.m. Friday from the National Hurricane Center.

nola.com

image via National Hurricane Center

Tropical Storm Fiona moves west

Tropical Storm Fiona is moving into the Caribbean toward the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. As of 7 a.m. Friday, Fiona was about 175 miles east of Guadeloupe and was moving west at 15 mph. The center of Fiona is forecast to move across the Leeward Islands late Friday and early Saturday, and move near or south of the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico this weekend. It’s expected to turn northwest on Sunday. However, the long-range forecast can change. Fiona has winds of 50 mph and slight strengthening is expected in the next few days. Peak winds of 70 mph are expected over the weekend, making it just shy of a Category 1 hurricane, which have winds of at least 74 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. Fiona is expected to bring tropical storm conditions to the Leeward Islands by Friday afternoon. Gusty winds and heavy rain are also possible in the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. Up to 12 inches of rain are possible from the storm. Life-threatening surf and rip current conditions are also possible.

Tropical Storm Fiona is moving into the Caribbean toward the Leeward Islands and Puerto Rico. As of 7 a.m. Friday, Fiona was about 175 miles east of Guadeloupe and was moving west at 15 mph. The center of Fiona is forecast to move across the Leeward Islands late Friday and early Saturday, and move near or south of the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico this weekend. It’s expected to turn northwest on Sunday. However, the long-range forecast can change. Fiona has winds of 50 mph and slight strengthening is expected in the next few days. Peak winds of 70 mph are expected over the weekend, making it just shy of a Category 1 hurricane, which have winds of at least 74 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. Fiona is expected to bring tropical storm conditions to the Leeward Islands by Friday afternoon. Gusty winds and heavy rain are also possible in the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Hispaniola. Up to 12 inches of rain are possible from the storm. Life-threatening surf and rip current conditions are also possible. Tropical storm warning is in effect for: Antigua, Barbuda, St. Kitts, Nevis, Montserrat and Anguilla, Saba and St. Eustatius, St. Maarten and Guadeloupe, St. Barthelemy and St. Martin. A tropical storm watch is in effect for: Puerto Rico, including Vieques and Culebra, U.S. Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands and Dominica.

image via National Hurricane Center

Disturbance in central Atlantic

Hurricane forecasters also are tracking another disturbance that’s over the central Atlantic. It’s moving northwest into the open water, and forecasters said some slow development is possible early next week. It has a 20% chance of developing into at least a tropical depression within 5 days. The shaded area on the graphic is where a storm could develop and is not a track. The National Hurricane Center releases a track when a tropical depression forms or is about to form. The categories, in order of increasing strength, are tropical depression, tropical storm and hurricane (categories 1 through 5). Systems are named when they develop into a tropical storm. The next available name is Gaston.

The third one is not mentioned. Stopping here and just the reminder – be alert!

Hurricane update for Friday 16 Sept